Uncommon museums of Florence #3: Museo di Casa Martelli

Uncommon museums of Florence #3: Museo di Casa Martelli

PHOTOS & SPANISH VERSION BELOW

There is always an interesting spot to discover in Florence that keeps us away from the common repertoire, this is the case for the so-called Martelli’s House Museum. The Museo di Casa Martelli was a residential palace inhabited since the beginning of the 16th century by the bankers family Martelli. In 1986, Francesca Martelli, last family member living there, left the house to the Curia of Florence. In 1998, the Curia sold the palace to the Italian State and it became a museum in 2009. From that point on, the palace is a state civic museum that displays the remains of the Martelli family valuable art collection, as well as the house frescoes.

There was a time when the palace hosted two works attributed to Donatello: a statue of David and the family coat of arms. Nowadays, the collection includes works by Piero di Cosimo, Francesco Francia, Francesco Morandini, Salvator Rosa, Giordano, Beccafumi, Sustermans, Michael Sweerts, Pieter Brueghel the Younger, Orazio Borgianni and Francesco Curradi, among others. The palace is located in the city centre, on Via Ferdinando Zannetti 8. It opens on Thursdays and Saturdays and admits only guided group visits available in English and Italian.


Museos inusuales de Florencia #3: Museo di Casa Martelli

Siempre hay algún museo interesante por descubrir en Florencia que se zafe del repertorio habitual. El Museo di Casa Martelli fue un palacio residencial habitado desde principios del siglo XVI por la poderosa familia de banqueros Martelli. Desde 2009 es un museo cívico estatal que muestra los restos de la valiosa colección de arte de la familia Martelli, así como sus salas embellecidas con pinturas y frescos. El palacio acogió en su momento dos obras atribuidas a Donatello: una estatua de David y el escudo de armas de la familia.

En 1986, Francesca Martelli legó la casa a la Curia de Florencia, que en 1998 vendió el complejo al Estado italiano. En 2009 el antiguo palacio abrió sus puertas convertido en museo. La colección incluye obras de Piero di Cosimo, Francesco Francia, Francesco Morandini, Salvator Rosa, Giordano, Beccafumi, Sustermans, Michael Sweerts, Pieter Brueghel el Joven, Orazio Borgianni y Francesco Curradi, entre otros. Ubicado en Via Ferdinando Zannetti 8, en el centro de Florencia, este museo abre únicamente los jueves y sábados, y solo admite visitas en grupos guiados, en inglés y en italiano.

Author Gravater

Paco Neumann

Paco Neumann is a journalist, photographer, proofreader, flâneur and perpetual amateur currently living in between Florence, Berlin and Tenerife. He´s been a regular contributor to fashion, art, trend and lifestyle magazines and worked for news, advertising and communication agencies

Related Post

Leave a comment

Centro de preferencias de privacidad

¿Quieres cerrar tu cuenta?

Se cerrará tu cuenta y todos los datos se borrarán de manera permanente y no se podrán recuperar ¿Estás seguro?

A %d blogueros les gusta esto: